FINANCIAL PLANNING

An Honest Look At The Personal Finance Crisis 

"Millions of baby boomers are moving into their senior years with empty pockets and declining choices to earn a living. And right behind them is a younger generation facing the same challenges. In this deeply personal talk, author Elizabeth White opens up an honest conversation about financial trouble and offers practical advice for how to live a richly textured life on a limited income."

Elizabeth White  | TEDxVCU

Why Retirees Should at Least Consider a Financial Adviser

I certainly have met and spoken with retirees who have the skills and time to manage their finances in later life. And yes, many advisers typically charge, annually, 1% of assets under management. If the value of your nest egg is, say, $1.5 million, then $15,000 goes to your adviser. (Check carefully if an adviser tells you: “My help is tax-deductible.” Some, but not all, adviser fees fall under that heading.)

By Glenn Ruffenach

For The Wall Street Journal 

Estate Plans Don’t Have to Be Just for People

"While that’s exactly what most pet owners do (if they do anything at all), others say that creating a formal estate plan for pets can help ensure they receive a continuing and high level of care should you die before they do. It also could keep them out of a shelter, which is where many pets end up after their owners die."

By Cheryl Winokur Munk

For The Wall Street Journal 

BOOKS ON TOPIC

Here's How Much You Should Have Saved At Every Age 

"By saving a bit more today — and making sure to invest as well — you can create momentum toward saving even more in the future. It'll all be worth it when you're relaxing on a beach during retirement."

By Lauren Lyons Cole/Business Insider

For Money Online

Helping Women Over 50 Face Their Financial Fears

"Women tend to live longer than men and must plan accordingly. In the United States, the average life expectancy is 81.2 years for women and 76.5 for men. This means women will most likely have to deal with money matters at some point, whether they like it or not."

By Abby Ellis 
For The New York Times